Tag Archives: mobile

NHS Hackday and the oPortfol.io

This weekend I was at NHS Hackday. Doctors, other healthcare workers, students, patients, organisations and software developers came together in their free time to make stuff that could make the NHS better.

Thanks to @londonlime

Thanks to @londonlime

I was astounded by the last Hackday. I didn’t think my expectations could be surpassed. They were.

The projects were diverse, aiming to solve everyday problems at all levels of the NHS. You can see the list on the Google doc and they’ll be on the wiki soon. The highly deserved winner was OpenHeart. The team used the amazing open source electronic health record at Moorfields Hospital, Open Eyes, and adapted it for use in Cardiology. The end result was stunning. It will save hours of doctors’ time, will create patient records that are much more understandable for patients themselves and for GPs, and will improve communication and therefore the quality of care.

Another favourite was Dementia scrapbook, an app to allow family and friends to contribute to a virtual scrapbook of memories and reminders. It has an easy to use touch interface that can be used by carers or people with dementia themselves. Dementia is common and this takes a very patient-centred approach to solving problems many of us may face in the future. I hope to see it available soon on the app store.

Cellcountr, initially hacked at the Liverpool hackday, was built on with additional features such as data visualisation and a customisable keyboard. It will be launched in the next month at a Pathology conference, and will then make a real difference to doctors, and their ability to accurately diagnosis patients with haematological conditions.

So what did we do? We created oPortfolio, an open API which allows trainee doctors to record learning events online, offline and on the go. It includes a webapp, a mobile-friendly site, an iPhone app, and an android app that all synch data. From nothing to all this in 36 hours! The team were incredible: full of talent, patience, and creativity.

Oportfolio

What does it do?

It solves an immediate need to log learning events on the go (see examples below). It lays the foundation for a more complex system to log assessments and meetings. With (quite a bit) more work it could be a simple open portfolio that doctors who are not currently in a training programme (eg LATs, people doing fellow jobs in between F2 and speciality training) could use to track their professional development. The funding model would have to be clarified as development and hosting is not free! It could also be an arena to experiment with and showcase new ways of organising a professional portfolio that could usefully feed into the debate on what and who a portfolio is for. It could highlight how different systems talking to each other and 3rd party apps and plug-ins have the potential to improve a core product. Another fabulous creation was Quicklog, an app to log personal development in performing procedures on the go. They built in data visualisation to encourage reflection and chart progress. It would be fantastic if the data from Quicklog could be integrated into a portfolio system. Anyone who is interested (and understands it!)  should look at the code on github for oPortfolio and Quicklog!

Screen Shot 2013-01-28 at 11.55.34

What does it not do?

It is not a replacement for the current ePortfolio system(s). The NES ePortfolio and others (eg surgical portfolio) are complex structures build up over years, with thousands and thousands of pounds of investment. Many have questioned whether they are value for money and I can’t answer that but good software does cost. Existing systems have  layers of access rights and methods of data extraction since these were priorities for the bodies who paid for them. They have cloud hosting and data security. People have spent years making them do what they do and it would be crazy to think they could be replicated in a weekend. They have their problems and must be improved but they are here to stay until a better alternative exists.

The focus of building a model Oportfolio was the user experience. If it was developed further it could fulfil a need for trainees who are not in a current training programme, who currently use various cobbled together documents on Evernote, phone notes apps, word documents and paper to record their learning and showcase their achievements when applying for jobs. With regular end-user input it could be beautiful, and a joy to use!

I am sure that our exploits this weekend will appear highly challenging and controversial to some. But I am not controversial. I have always highlighted the frustrations felt by trainees (which are well known) but advocated for engagement with all interested parties: individual trainees, trainers/educational supervisors, LETBs, Trusts, Royal Colleges, current ePortfolio provider NES, the GMC and HEE. We need to get our heads together and think about what the future of training will look like, what tools are needed to enhance learning, and how they will be funded.

The NHS can’t keep putting up with unintuitive, inflexible IT that doesn’t match the realities of practice. As demonstrated at NHS Hackday; intelligence, enthusiasm, creativity, a few humous sandwiches and some coffee can create magic. But that magic needs support and investment to make it sustainable. Muir Gray says change in the NHS will come from the bottom up. He is one of a few inspirational people at the top supporting projects in which frontline staff make a difference. We could do with a few more like him….

Advertisements

An app-ortunity

Quite reasonably I have been asked how an NHS ePortfolio app would benefit doctors, and what it would have to do to be worth any investment. In my opinion the need for an app is driven by the need to make WPBAs more relevant. An app would put control back in the hands of trainees, and make life significantly easier for trainers/assessors. This would reduce resentment towards WBPAs and would save an unimaginably huge amount of time for a stressed, squeezed, overworked profession.

The current situation:

I am doctor in training (this covers everyone who is not yet a Consultant/GP partner). I am required to complete a certain number of WPBAs to progress. One day I am at work and am on call admitting new patients to hospital. I think I’ve made a pretty thorough assessment of a patient with a condition I’ve not encountered before and ask my Consultant if, after presentation of the case on the post-take ward round they can fill in a mini-CEX. They say yes.

I present my case during the round and the Consultant provides some useful immediate feedback on my assessment, including a recommendation to read a recent review on the subject in an academic medical journal. However, the Consultant has another 7 patients to review after this and can’t stop to find a computer, login, wait for it to load up, access the NHS ePortfolio website, login and complete the assessment. “Send me a ticket” they say, with a genuine intent to complete is as soon as possible. My shift gets busier and after 13hours at work I go straight to bed when I get home. The next day i am very busy and forget to send the ticket via email. I remember when I get home but realise I don’t know the Consultant’s email address. It’s a weekend so I’m not in for another 2 days. I set a reminder with an alarm on my phone and on Monday the alarm prompts me to retrieve the email  from the hospital system and I send the ticket from the NHS ePortfolio site.

A week later the assessment has not been completed and I send a reminder. Three days after this I bump into the Consultant in the lunch queue and gently remind them about the mini-CEX. They make excuses, feel bad, and promise to do it ASAP.

A week after this the Consultant finally has some time for admin and discovers my reminder email in their inbox. They login and struggle to remember anything about the patient or the feedback they gave me. They have an overall impression of whether I’m any good or not and complete the assessment mainly based on this overall view, rather than the specifics of the case we discussed. I get an email to say that the assessment has been completed. At a later date I login and read the comments, which are brief, and get no educational benefit from the recording of the episode. I do however feel less stressed as that’s one less assessment to get ticked off. I can’t remember the author of the review recommended by the Consultant and never quite get round to searching for it.

A possible future situation:

One day I am at work and am on call admitting new patients to hospital. I think I’ve made a pretty thorough assessment of a patient with a condition I’ve not encountered before and ask my Consultant if, after presentation of the case on the post-take ward round they can fill in a mini-CEX. They say yes.

I present my case during the round and the Consultant provides some useful immediate feedback on my assessment. I get out my smartphone and login to the NHS ePortfolio app. I bring up the mini-CEX form and we complete it together adding comments based on the feedback the Consultant has just given, including the recommendation to read a recent review by author X in journal Y. There is a prompt to enter the Consultant’s email address so that they can validate the mini-CEX as an accurate representation of the assessment, and I input this as the Consultant dictates it. I save the form. The Consultant continues with the post-take ward round. I continue to admit new patients.

When I get home my phone picks up my wifi signal, and the ePortfolio app automatically synchs with my account so that the mini-CEX is uploaded. An email is sent to my Consultant and me to inform us of this new entry on my ePortfolio. I don’t have to waste time chasing up multiple assessments like this, so actually get round to looking up the review recommended by the Consultant, and learn something that will benefit my future patients.

It is essential that an NHS ePortfolio app:

  • is cross platform (iPhone, android etc)
  • can perform most functions offline with synching later with the main site. Most NHS hospitals have no wifi and poor phone sinal coverage. If an app required wifi it would be of no use to many, many, users

Another possible function would be to record reflection-in-action – essentially quick notes about things that happen that are particularly challenging, satisfying etc. There would then be scope to comment on this in the portfolio later (reflection-on-action).  Professionals must be reflective to learn and develop, but there is debate around the value of writing down these reflections. An app would at least make the process easier for those that wished to do this.

Oh, and of course ideally it would be free. But I’d pay £0.69 to make my life easier, wouldn’t you?

Would you use on ePortfolio app?